APPROACHING BALLISTIC TRANSPORT IN SUSPENDED GRAPHENE PDF

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: The discovery of graphene raises the prospect of a new class of nanoelectronic devices based on the extraordinary physical properties of this one-atom-thick layer of carbon. Unlike two-dimensional electron layers in semiconductors, where the charge carriers become immobile at low densities, the carrier mobility in graphene can remain high, even when their density vanishes at the Dirac point. View on PubMed.

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The discovery of graphene raises the prospect of a new class of nanoelectronic devices based on the extraordinary physical properties of this one-atom-thick layer of carbon. Unlike two-dimensional electron layers in semiconductors, where the charge carriers become immobile at low densities, the carrier mobility in graphene can remain high, even when their density vanishes at the Dirac point.

However, when the graphene sample is supported on an insulating substrate, potential fluctuations induce charge puddles that obscure the Dirac point physics. Here we show that the fluctuations are significantly reduced in suspended graphene samples and we report low-temperature mobility approaching , cm2 V-1 s-1 for carrier densities below 5 x cm Such values cannot be attained in semiconductors or non-suspended graphene.

Moreover, unlike graphene samples supported by a substrate, the conductivity of suspended graphene at the Dirac point is strongly dependent on temperature and approaches ballistic values at liquid helium temperatures. At higher temperatures, above K, we observe the onset of thermally induced long-range scattering.

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Comment in Graphene: nanoelectronics goes flat out. Freitag M. Nat Nanotechnol. PMID: No abstract available. Similar articles Contact and edge effects in graphene devices.

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Approaching Ballistic Transport in Suspended Graphene

The discovery of graphene raises the prospect of a new class of nanoelectronic devices based on the extraordinary physical properties of this one-atom-thick layer of carbon. Unlike two-dimensional electron layers in semiconductors, where the charge carriers become immobile at low densities, the carrier mobility in graphene can remain high, even when their density vanishes at the Dirac point. However, when the graphene sample is supported on an insulating substrate, potential fluctuations induce charge puddles that obscure the Dirac point physics. Here we show that the fluctuations are significantly reduced in suspended graphene samples and we report low-temperature mobility approaching , cm2 V-1 s-1 for carrier densities below 5 x cm

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Approaching ballistic transport in suspended graphene

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Approaching ballistic transport in suspended graphene.

The discovery of graphene1,2 raises the prospect of a new class ofnanoelectronic devices based on the extraordinary physicalproperties36 of this one-atom-thick layer of carbon. Unliketwo-dimensional electron layers in semiconductors, where thecharge carriers become immobile at low densities, the carriermobility in graphene can remain high, even when their densityvanishes at the Dirac point. However, when the graphenesample is supported on an insulating substrate, potentialfluctuations induce charge puddles that obscure the Dirac pointphysics. Here we show that the fluctuations are significantlyreduced in suspended graphene samples and we report low-temperature mobility approaching , cm2 V21 s21 forcarrier densities below 53 cm Such values cannot beattained in semiconductors or non-suspended graphene. Moreover, unlike graphene samples supported by a substrate,the conductivity of suspended graphene at the Dirac point isstrongly dependent on temperature and approaches ballisticvalues at liquid helium temperatures. At higher temperatures,above K, we observe the onset of thermally induced long-range scattering.

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